Source with several citations

 
 
 
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blsamuel
blsamuel's picture
Source with several citations

I could not find reference to this question in EE ....

Is it acceptable/accurate to cite a source, a census for example, without reference to an individual, then citing that source to more than one individual: 

Source: 

1900 U.S. census, Allen County, Kansas, population schedule, Moran City, digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 February 2105), citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 469

Citations: 

1. Winfield Samuel household, Enumeration District 0012, p. 1B (stamped), family no. 22, line 84.

2. Eva G. Samuel,  Enumeration District 0012, p. 1B (stampled), family no. 22, line 85.

3. Beula Samuel, daughter in parents household (Winfield Samuel), Enumeration District 0012, p. 1B (stamped), family no. 22, line 86

and so on....

other examples would be Findagrave, WWI Registration cards (same locale), Military pension records that cite several people, etc. 

Thanks

EE
EE's picture

blsamuel, sources are not tied to individuals. They are attached to "facts" or assertions. The first time we make an assesrtion that came from a source, we cite that source in full, down to the specific page/entry/whatever that supports the assertion to which it is attached.

Thereafter, in that same piece of writing (which would include an individual's narrative within our database), we can use a short form of the census. However, three points should be kept in mind:

  1. The shortened citation must still contain enough information to identify it. In each of the shortened citations above, there is not enough information to identify which census year or locale.  
  2. It's never wise to use short forms until a piece of writing is ready for publication. During the research and writing processes, we frequently delete information. If we delete an assertion to which the full cite is attached, then all subsequent short forms of that citation would left without their full identifying information.
  3. If we are using genealogical software (which I suspect you are), then the first time we use a source, we create the three basic types in a template: Source List Entry, Full Reference Note, and Shortened Citation. Thereafter, when we use that source, we choose the Full Reference Note, let the software automatically populate the fields, and then add just the specific data for the household of interest. When we print a "report" from the database, most software will then automatically assign full or shortened citations as appropriate.

EE's Chapter 6 "Censuses," demonstrates how to handle the creation of short forms for a variety of censuses.

The Editor

blsamuel
blsamuel's picture

EE-thank you for the clarification. I will alter accordingly! 

I very much appreciate this website - great assistance for genealogy researchers striving to "do it right!"

Bonnie

EE
EE's picture

Glad to help, Bonnie. I've battled my own frustrations—for decades!—with sources and their analysis. Just when we get comfortable with using one type of record that was created a certain way, we find ourselves snared by others!

The Editor